Work Caboose Construction - 2

I added some stripwood framing to the window,


and stripwood slats for the sideboards.


I used CA glue to attach the wooden slats to the plastic side posts.


A scribed sheet was provided in the Cache Creek kit for the roof. I wet it and bent it around a can to warp it to match the curve at the top of the end walls.


Once the sideboards were dry, the flatcar got another shot of primer. I painted the inside of the cabin black, and the trim on the cabin Armour Dark Green.

Starting on Car Construction


I find the trucks to be the most difficult part of building a Chivers kit. I deviated from the instructions a bit and used a great construction tip I saved off Geren Mortensen’s old On30 forum. Once assembled, the trucks are very free-wheeling and look great.


The sideframes of Chivers flatcars have the posts and pockets molded on, so I cut and sanded them off where the Cache Creek structure will slide down over the sides.


I discovered that a block from a 2 x 4 stud fits exactly between the sideposts, making a nice jig to hold the car while assembling the underframe.


The hardest part of assembling the underframe is threading the trussrods over the queenposts and under the bolsters.


Moving on to the Cache Creek resin caboose, I found this clamp in my tool drawer. It is really the bomb when it comes to holding the walls together at the corner for gluing.



Fast setting CA glue and the right angle clamp had the caboose body together in no time.


A test fit of the Cache Creek caboose on the Chivers flatcar.