Weigh Scale Track -1

Last month a few friends and I visited a layout that included weigh scales as part of the operation.
This got me to thinking about the scale I am planning to include on my layout.



I had installed the pad for the scale when I laid the track for Shops Yard, and used
Kit-O-Mat software to design the scale house.


My scale house is a slightly modified version of this chicken coup.



Referring to photos of the scale track at Rockhill on the
EBT, I determined that the “live” rails that crossed the scale were offset pretty far from the “dead” rails that heavy locomotives rode on to bypass the weigh scale mechanism. On the three foot gauge EBT, the rails were offset half the gauge from each other, or 18 inches apart. I tacked the rails down on my scale track to see what half the gauge, or 15 inch offset, looked like. That appeared to be pretty extreme, and I began to move the rails closer together until the offset between the live and dead rails “looked right” to me.



I ended up with a relatively small offset between the rails across the pad. Probably too small, but I wanted to be sure the offset did not adversely affect operation of cars being weighed on the live rails.



Even the lightest cars should not have a problem staying coupled and on the rails going over the scale.



With throwrods installed, completion of the scale track is waiting for delivery of servo switch motors.