The talc operation

This section of the layout is shaping to be nothing like what I originally planned.
Backing away from initial assumptions has been a source of both anxiety and excitement. In many ways the section of the layout I call Ariel Church has become the "newest" section of the layout in my mind. The town scene initially planned would not fit, which caused me to question my ability to pre-visualize scenes. But learning from Jim Farrar about talc mineral deposits in Nelson County opened up a very interesting possibility for Ariel Church.

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This is the part of the layout in question. I have been using blocks, boxes, and anything else at hand to help lay out the scene.

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This concept sketch shows my ideas for the scene from about the same angle as the photograph. The fascia follows the profile of a high ridge that forms an effective view block separating the developed scene to the left from the remote, rugged scene to the right. An 18 inch gauge tram enters the scene high above the creek, crosses over the 30 inch gauge railroad, then curves hard to the left to enter a crusher and tipple scene. The tipple is over a siding that runs into a deep cut.

Working out the angle and various levels of this scene made it seem complicated, but it actually is simpler than the town scene that I assumed would go here when I planned the layout.

The GP&C Remembered - VI

Rainetown

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It’s April again, and that means it is time to dig out some more photos of Dan George’s HO scale Spring Creek Lumber Company layout.

The Greenbrier & Pocahontas Central was abandoned and dismantled in April of 2005.

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Rainetown was in a corner of the lower level of Dan’s layout, at the bottom of the helix that connected the lower track to the upper level.

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Various hidden bypass, connecting, and cutoff tracks all emerged at Rainetown, resulting in a long line of tunnel portals. Dan filled the scene with a concentration of visual decoys to divert attention away from the unrealistic series of tunnel entrances.

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Some of his diversionary tactics were rather crude, but most were amazing scratchbuilt structures bristling with detail and activity.

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All this eye candy had the effect of inviting close attention to Rainetown, rather than diverting attention away.

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Experiencing scenes like Rainetown on Dan’s layout was very disruptive to my notions of model railroading at the time. I first started visiting Dan and operating on his layout in the late 1990s. At the time I had just finished a detached shop building that had a studio space to be dedicated to a model railroad layout. I had enjoyed countless hours of designing the layout, and more countless hours of visualizing how the layout would operate and the traffic flow. But the actual construction of the layout was not something I spent a lot of time day dreaming about. I thought of layout construction as an awkward gestation period that could not be avoided.

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Dan’s layout was a sprawling testament to a different set of priorities for building a model railroad. It illustrated how a model railroad could be an excellent vehicle for displaying craft and an interest in industrial history if the construction phase of the project was approached with the same creative and innovative thought that I was only willing to apply to design.

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Still smarting from the expense of building my shop, I felt obligated to build the best layout I could, and saw Dan’s layout as the definitive reference point. It came as a huge disappointment when trying to adopt a new priority for layout construction caused me to freeze like a deer in the headlights. On a superficial level, I had bought into a new approach to the hobby, buy I still had deep preconceived notions that were telling me that this new approach was not appropriate. Much hand wringing and journaling ensued. I searched for an approach to the problem that would help me make progress on my East Blue Ridge layout. Eventually I realized that this new approach I was struggling to come up with was already a well-worn path called
design thinking, with many helpful resources available on the Internet.

On30 in Virginia

I had a great time visiting a few On30 modelers and their layouts this month.

Tom Sullivan

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Tom has gotten a lot done on his new layout. This one has a Maine two foot theme.

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The layout has numerous operational focal points, with plenty to keep operators busy.

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I was impressed by how much historical information Tom is incorporating into the operation of this layout. As we discussed possibilities for managing operations, I learned a great deal about the two foot railroads.

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Train time in Albion. The local crew has a few sidings to work, and will have to turn the locomotive and combine for the return trip.


Ashe Rawls

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I am lucky to have Ashe as a neighbor. His new layout is a source of inspiration for me and everyone who visited during the Module Meet last March.

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Ashe has a real knack for building structures. His layout is an excellent vehicle for displaying his talents.

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A great source of tricks and tips, Ashe is always trying new techniques and materials.

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His layout is covered with highly detailed craftsman kits, and he is finishing up a big scratchbuilt sawmill with a complete interior.


Mike Nataluk

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Mike is well along in building a large layout that has modular benchwork

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Mike has brought his considerable modeling experience and vast collection of shop tools to bear on my kitbash conundrums.

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Mike and I both like to run smaller locomotives and rolling stock on our layouts. He has collected and built a wide range of smaller equipment.

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Very impressive little geared steam locomotive models populate his engine facilities.

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Mike also has an eye for creating little narrative scenes on his layout.

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I enjoyed looking through Mike’s collection of unpublished information about Maine two foot narrow gauge railroads.

Guide to Narrow Gauge

The mailman recently delivered my copy of a new model railroading book

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The book contains a few photos I took, as well as some information about my layout. I am delighted that Tony considered my material and that I was able to contribute to this project.

The general consensus among my fellow modelers is that
Guide to Narrow Gauge Modeling is geared toward someone who is interested in building a layout and is considering narrow gauge. Those of us who have already made the commitment to narrow gauge modeling may find the book a little too broad in scope and too thin in depth. Much like the “Wonderful World of Model Railroading” books I used to get for Christmas growing up, the subject matter is too complex to be effectively covered in an overview.

Indeed, when Tony Koester and I were emailing back and forth back in April, I was wondering if a book with resources pulled from here, there, and everywhere would lack overall coherance. But that was the editor’s problem, not mine. I was happy to help any way I could.


As a relatively recent convert to narrow gauge modeling, I well remember being a member of this publication’s target audience. Ten years ago, I had an HO standard gauge layout that was generally not succeeding. The aspect of that layout I enjoyed the most was the stone handling industrial shortline that I called Greenbrier Lime & Stone.

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This tight industrial scene was my favorite part of the Dry Fork layout

This realization was somewhat conflicting. All the tedious, overthought, deep consideration I had given the design of my layout had been guided by the teachings of Tony Koester and John Armstrong. Being an inexperienced modeler, my Dry Fork & Greenbrier layout suffered under the weight of trying to be as interesting to operate as possible. Apprehending a world “beyond the basement” through the use of hidden staging only works if the mechanical operation of the system is flawless and control is devoid of any distracting issues. I learned the hard way how important reliable operation is, and how little interest I had in extending my railroad “beyond the basement.”

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A local passes through the gaudy West Virginia mountains on my old DF&G layout

Discovering that the simple, straightforward operation of the GL&S was my favorite part of the Dry Fork layout sent me down a different path. Instead of trying to design in the most operation possible, I tried to determine the least operation my layout could have and still be interesting for the long term. The simple, spare trackplans I emailed my modeling friends during that time “looked narrow gauge” to them. I changed my guidance from the standard gauge “timetable/train order” group to the narrow gauge group. At that point, if
Guide to Narrow Gauge Modeling had been available, I would have purchased a copy. And the single part of it that would have impressed me the most would have been the illustration of the prototype Manns Creek coal loader at Clifftop, West Virginia paired with the excellent modeling of Jeff Kraker.

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Campus of Alberene Stone in the mid ’80s.

I began to consider modeling the soapstone operations of Nelson County, which were just the type of interesting, obscure, industrial subject that could make for a successful narrow gauge layout.

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Mike works a local on Brian’s On3 layout

As it happened, I was lucky enough to fall into the company of narrow gauge modelers who were interested in operation. Tom Sullivan, Brian Bond, and Steve Sherrill have become great friends who have been very patient and generous with their time and talents. Operating on their layouts convinced me that simple industrial railroads represent an excellent modeling opportunity. Since then, my narrow gauge operating crew has grown considerably. Research, construction, and operation are an ongoing source of enjoyment for all of us. The operation may be simplistic, but increased emphasis on the craft of portraying the character of the prototype more than makes up the difference in project interest.

Lycoming On30 Summer Meet

Janet and I took a long weekend roadtrip to attend Al Judy’s On30 Meet in Milton, Pennsylvania.

I chose a route to Lycoming County that bypassed Northern Virginia traffic and sent us through Orbisonia, Pennsylvania.

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Though not in operation, the EBT is still an amazing thing to see.

We stopped at the East Broad Top yards at Rockhill Furnace.

We were both impressed with the beauty of rural central Pennsylvania; big farms in rolling valleys.

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Downtown Williamsport and the Susquehanna Valley.

Having never been to Williamsport, we were impressed with the
Genetti Hotel and surrounding neighborhood.

The Lycoming On30 meet was a lot of fun. There were tables and table of items available to spend money on, and I’m afraid I took full advantage of the opportunity.

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Al Judy’s module

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Alan Carroll’s fantastic 2-10-4 Forney

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Steve Sherrill’s Dead Rail modules

We also got to see an On30 layout in a museum at the old resort town of Eagles Mere.

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The layout features scenery depicting actual points along the line

The layout portrays the old narrow gauge railroad that once climbed the mountain to reach several large resort hotels.

Al was kind enough to open his
home layout for us to see.

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The Mill Creek & Lycoming

All in all a fine weekend of scenic views, great hospitality, and model railroading.